Author
Angelo
Pettolino
LIGO
ozone
SKY LAB AND APOLLO
GRAVITY
ACCRETION
VOYAGER 1
SOLAR WIND
HELIOPAUSE
HELIOSPHERIC GASES
ICE AGE
THE AP THEORY
Eugene Parker
BOLTZMANN
mv2 = 3/2 kT
F = ma
Maxwell’s laws
Michael Faraday
CLIMATE CHANGE
GLOBAL WARMING
JOSEPH PRIESTLY
PROTEROZOIC, ACHAEAN, PHANEROZOIC,
EQUINOX
International Space Station
21st CENTURY ASTRONOMY
CHAPTER 6 Continued
Chapter 6 Continued
A second internal, high-pressure galvanic eruption (CME) propelled more subatomic particles of fractured, condensed photosphere upwards into space, establishing Pluto, Eros, and the Kuiper belt 4.7 billion years ago. The Kuiper Belt was discovered in 1992. The solar debris of rockey bodies exploded from the Sun’s photosphere and still comprises a large area of our solar system. Most of the comets in our  solar system can still be found in the outer reaches of the Oort cloud.
The Sun’s ruptured lava shell allowed the melting condensed mountains of previously formed  water and subatomic particles of mixed gases and matter to flood into the solar cauldron. This mixture of liquid and magma coming into contact with each other caused a powerful galvanic explosion. The tremendous internal explosion caused the gigantic cloud of newly formed water vapour to be ejected through the solar shell into the absolute-zero environments of the cosmos and it drifted into interplanetary space where newly formed and ejected Earth collided with it this event is known as the Theia collision (Great Impact). The melted remainder of the water flooded into the photosphere’s gaping volcano-like hole, which was blasted open and exposed by the first and second eruptions.
A third hydrostatic eruption (CME) of extremely high pressure from the subatomic gas steam molecules and subatomic elements of water vapour manifested from fission, then blasted into the absolute-zero temperature of interstellar space. The Sun’s photosphere and noble gases with the lowest atomic weight (e.g. H2 + He) travelled farthest, where they solidified and formed the gaseous planets Neptune and Uranus. The third solar explosion propelled Saturn 840 million miles from its  planetary exit point  from the  Sun (Plate 1). The remaining split atoms of elements and gases with heavier atomic weights (e.g. CO2) came to rest closer to the Sun, forming the atmospheres of some regions of the terrestrial planets Mercury, Venus,  Mars, and Jupiter (plate 3).
Earth’s ecosystem formed its atmosphere of Oxygen gas from living plants and its nitrogen gas from its amino acidic and alkaline of disintegrated vegetation and elements (ammonium nitrate, etc.), making contact with each other in the presence of water. These disintegrated elements were produced from Earth’s natural and constant vibration. All the naturally occurring elements on Earth have atomic weights of between 1 (hydrogen) and 94 (plutonium) atomic mass units, and they all originated from and were produced by our Sun.

When Jupiter exploded from within the Sun’s extremely hot cauldron during the Sun’s fourth eruption (CME), it fractured more than 10 per cent of the Sun’s outer shell.  Jupiter’s violent exit formed the asteroid belt from ejected, pulverized photosphere and solar mantle material. The a steroid belt is located in an arc from the Sun’s surface between Mars and Jupiter (plate 4).
Every twelve years, Jupiter travels directly behind the Sun and cannot be seen from Earth for only twelve hours. Considering this, it takes 5.10 years of the 12-year cycle for Jupiter to reach 30 million miles above the plane of the Sun, and after another 5.10 years, it returns to a point directly behind the Sun, as seen from Earth, without crossing the Sun’s equator.  Jupiter is in a position in the sky to be seen every day of the year and is travelling in a ‘great circle’. These facts imply that Jupiter is not circling around the  equator of the Sun but that Jupiter and all the other planets are circling above the celestial poles of the Sun at slower speeds and over shorter distances than are presently supposed. In order for A (Jupiter) to orbit B (the Sun), A must cross B’s equator twice before it can be described as an orbit.  Jupiter does not cross the  equator of the Sun twice in its 10.8-year journey above the celestial poles of the Sun.
(Jupiter Plate)
JUPITER
82 - 83
83
Hadron Collider
QUICK
FIND